News and Events

OpEd: "Why aren't the candidates talking about nuclear war?"
When the Cold War ended, we pretty much stopped worrying about nuclear war, but the weapons didn’t go away. More than 15,000 are left in the world today, 95 percent in the arsenals of the U.S. and Russia.  Seven other countries have nuclear arsenals as well.

World Medical Association calls on governments to ban and eliminate nuclear weapons
The General Assembly of the World Medical Association, unanimously adopted a new resolution condemning nuclear weapons, stating that the medical profession has a duty to work for the elimination of nuclear weapons, and urging all governments to work to ban and eliminate them. IPPNW and its affiliates, many of whose members are active in national medical associations, will work to ensure that this resolution is promoted and acted upon as widely as possible.

Perspective: Docs and Nukes — Still a Live Issue
"In recognition of this grave threat to human survival, governments around the world have come together over the past 3 years in a series of extraordinary conferences to discuss the medical consequences, what they have called the humanitarian impact, of nuclear war... We believe the medical community has a responsibility to support this movement. The American Medical Association recently passed a resolution calling on all nations to “ban and eliminate nuclear weapons,” and the World Medical Association is considering a similar resolution at its Moscow meeting in October."

The results are in! Watch the winners from the short film award
IPPNW's U.S. affiliate PSR, with support from NSquare, held a short film contest to raise awareness about what's at stake if we are complacent about nuclear weapons.

European health groups launch Medical Peace Work case studies
The twelve case studies depict challenging situations for health professionals in the search of preventing and reducing violence – as well as promoting peace, sustainable development, and human rights.

Cluster Munitions Convention Review Conference, Dubrovnik
The clear rejection by states of the weapon and the commitment to "work towards a world free of the suffering, casualties and socio-economic impacts caused by cluster munitions," was adopted in the formal political declaration at the high-level conference.

Marking the 2015 International Day Against Nuclear Tests at the UN
IPPNW Co-President, Ira Helfand, participated in a United Nations panel on nuclear disarmament. Watch the video of his 10 minute talk here.

Countdown to the Arms Trade Treaty
IPPNW’s Bob Mtonga and other NGO colleagues called for diplomats to support strong implementation policies of the Arms Trade Treaty at the First Conference of States Parties in Mexico.

Ronald McCoy: Never Again Hiroshima, Nagasaki
"In the name of humanity, there must never again be another Hiroshima or Nagasaki. But we can only make sure of that, if we abolish every single nuclear weapon in the hands of the nine nuclear-armed states — the US, Russia, the United Kingdom, France, China, Israel, India, Pakistan and the Democratic Republic of Korea." 

IPPNW Co-President on the 70th anniversary of Hiroshima and Nagasaki
"For 70 years, we have told ourselves that nuclear weapons make us secure. But it is time to reject this fantasy and recognize that nuclear weapons are, in fact, the primary threat to our security -- that far from protecting us they pose an existential threat to our civilization, and perhaps to our survival as a species."

Doctors and Parliamentarians Dialogue on Small Arms Crisis
IPPNW leaders brought a public health perspective on armed violence to policy makers at two seminars in India and Peru organized by the Parliamentary Forum on Small Arms and Light Weapons, convened to discuss the Arms Trade Treaty and the UN Programme of Action on Small Arms.

Nuclear weapons abolition - a medical imperative
Dr. Sue Wareham in the Medical Journal of Australia: "The emergence now of a strong majority of the world's governments committed to the same goal represents unprecedented progress and opportunity. Medical voices are needed now as much as ever, to seize the opportunity while it lasts, and to help delegitimise and stigmatise these horrific devices."